A SELECTION OF KAMENGO GYPSUM HANDLING PROJECTS

RECYCLED GYPSUM STORAGE AND FEED (1995)

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

This installation is a retrofit of an existing front-end loaded hopper and feed system handling recycled gypsum. The stored recycled gypsum – is particularly nasty: it consists of crushed wet gypsum board reclaimed from construction debris, including nails and paper, and is stored in an outside pile subject to Vancouver’s wet weather. The hopper and feed system has provided reliable service since it was retrofitted in 1995.

SELF-UNLOADING SHIP STORAGE AND FEED (2002)

Winner of Lloyd’s List “Innovation in On-board Cargo Handling” Award

The first ship fitted with Kamengo Feeders went into service in 2002. The second ship fitted with Kamengo Feeders went into service in mid-2009. Each ship includes nine 100 foot long feeders. These ships have carried gypsum, coal, iron ore pellets, iron ore fines, granite aggregate, fertilizer, calcite and clinker cement.

In 2002, the Kamengo Feeder won a Lloyd’s List award for “Innovation in Onboard Cargo Handling”.

FGD (SYNTHETIC) GYPSUM STORAGE AND FEED (2013)

Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada

In 1997 Kamengo conducted flow characterization tests of FGD gypsum to determine critical design parameters for a bin and feeder to be used in outdoor artic conditions. In 2012, Kamengo was selected to deliver this installation, which includes a feeder, hopper and grizzly, 140-foot belt conveyor, crusher, transfer tower, and screw conveyor. Kamengo has also supplied a duplicate set-up of equipment for a sister plant, also in Fort McMurray.

FGD (SYNTHETIC) GYPSUM SILO RECLAIM (2009)

Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada

In 2009, Kamengo supplied two long feeders for metering FGD into a tailings remediation process. Each feeder discharged FGD gypsum from two 58-foot tall, 18-foot diameter, 47,000 cu-ft silos.

The concept of a single feeder reclaiming from two silos is an example of the unique ability of the Kamengo Feeder to reclaim evenly over a long length. Also, even though the amount of stored material above the feeder was quite high, only 15 HP was required to operate both feeders.